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ANNUAL REPORT TO THE MAYOR 
FOR 
1952 - 1953 



By the 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
of the 
CITY AND COUNTY OP SAN FRANCISCO 



./ 

717149 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 

September 4, 1953 

Honorable Elmer E. Robinson, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
San Francisco, California 

Through: Mr. Thomas A. Brooks 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Dear Mayor Robinson: 

In response to your request of August 3, 1953, addressed to all 
departments relative to the departmental work programs, I respectfully 
submit the following annual report of work performed by the Purchasing 
Department during the fiscal year 1952-1953: 

BUYING AND ACCOUNTING DIVISIONS 

Total Purchases made by the Purchasing Department for the 
various departments and the San Francisco Unified School District for: 

1952-1953 $12,763,513.74 

1951-1952 14,174,458.93 

a DECREASE of 1,410,945.19 

The Purchaser's Petty Purchase Revolving Fund, which has been 
extensively used this last fiscal year accounted for $299,520.92 
worth of small purchases for all the various departments. 

Pnyv.icnts and Discounts 



A continuous drive is in progress to expedite payments to 
vendors and take advantage of all cash discounts with particular 
attention being given to those payments involving large cash discounts 
Results have been very satisfactory and continue to improve. The 
cooperation of the Controller's Office and other City Departments has 
been very helpful in this connection. 

The fact that payments are now being processed more rapidly has 
been well received by vendors with whom the city does business. This 
has encouraged more local competition for city bids. 



-2- 

New Contract Procedure 

The new contract procedure which was being put into effect at 
the time of the last report has proven very satisfactory. A sub- 
stantial saving of time has been noted in completing transactions. 

Departmental Revolving Funds ( Various Departments ) 

With the cooperation and approval of the Controller's Office, 
those departments having revolving funds are now permitted to make 
cash purchases up to 315.00. All such expenditures are subsequently 
checked in the Purchasing Department as to correct price, contract 
items, and the like and also audited by the Controller's Office. 
Departments, particularly those with large amounts of stores, are thus 
enabled to delete from their inventories many slow moving standard 
items of relatively low unit value. 

Annual Bid Bond 

Bidders now have the option of filing an annual bid bond rather 
than submitting a certified check with each bid requiring a deposit. 
This has proved very popular with bidders, particularly those firms 
who submit numerous bids during the year. 

Controller 

All changes and improvements in procedure have been done with 
the complete approval and cooperation of the Controller, especially 
in those cases where accounting policies are involved or where pro- 
cedure changes in the Purchasing Department affect the related pro- 
cedures in the Controller's Office. 

Total amount of Purchase Orders written H952-1953: 

GENERAL | 4,576,294.23 

EDUCATION 2,281,006.54 

HEALTH 1,847,959.95 

UTILITIES 3,781,143.45 

REVOLVING FUND 299,520.92 



12,785,925.09 



Purchaser' s Petty Purchase Revolving Fund 



Since the last report, many improvements have been made in 
Petty Purchase Order procedure. The maximum amount has been raised 
from #25.00 to .$50.00, permitting more rapid processing and the pay- 
ment of a larger number of orders, to the mutual satisfaction of 
vendors and the various city departments. 



-3- 

Pur chaser ' s Petty Purchase Revolving Fund (C ontinued ) 

With the cooperation of the Controller's Office, a new system 
for payment of these orders has been effected. The orders are written 
and invoices are checked in the Purchasing Department. All informa- 
tion pertinent to payment is recapitulated by the Tabulating Bureau 
and forwarded to the Controller twice monthly, where warrants are pre- 
pared for each vendor. At the same time, departments are furnished 
with a statement of expenditures for their accounting records. This 
procedure ties in directly with the drive to expedite payments and take 
advantage of discounts. 

The following summary reflects the operation of bhe Purchase!' 's 
Revolving Fund for the Year 1952-1953: 

Number of individual orders written 14,344 

Average number of monthly orders written 1,195.3 

Total amount of money for fiscal year $i 299,520.92 

SALES AND INVENTORY DIVISION 

Sales 

47 Sales complete in themselves, plus one sale for Hay snd 
other Agricultural products which consisted of 20 individual Sales 
were conducted making an actual total of 67 Sales for the year. Total 
revenue of all Sales was $125,261.63. All Sales were of personal pro- 
perty unfit or unnecessary for the use of the City and County of San 
Francisco and all were made under the authority of Section 88 of the 
Charter and Sections 6.220 to 6.223 of the School Code. 

A breakdown of Sales reflects the following; 

Metal and Other Scrap f 46,144.37 

School Equipment 21,094.03 

Street Poles & High Potential Line 18,003.00 

Hay and Agricultural Products 15,434.69 

Swill 11,786.50 

Dried Sewage Sludge , 4,543.00 

Grease and Bones 2,652.75 

Automotive Equipment 1,755.03 

Waste Paper 239 .53 

Miscellaneous Sales . 3,608.73 

TOTAL REVENUE FROM S^LES $125 , 261 .63 



-4- 

Sales ( Continued ) 

A review of the various typos of equipment sold reflects a wide 
range of diversified items. Some unusual personal property disposed 
of included various Objects of Art auctioned at the de Young Museum, 
broken scales confiscated by the Sealer of heights and Measures, some 
obsolete Fire Engines, some Sheep from the Flock in Golden Gate Park, 
the Wool from the remaining Sheep, and some Scrap Copper from the City 
Hall Dome. Two unusual Sales were held covering the disposal of Street 
Polos and an overhead High Potential Lino to a private utility company; 
this equipment was purchased in place. 

The Sale of Agricultural Products conducted for the Water Depart- 
ment was broken down into 20 separate Sales hold as each crop ripened. 
The various lots of Alfalfa, Pasture and Volunteer Hay, Earley, Oats, 
and Wheat, an over-all tonnage of approximately 497 tons, netted the 
Water Department the sum of #15,434.69. 

A six month trial contract was awarded for the Sale of Dried 
Sewage Sludge produced at the South East Sewage Treatment Plant, which 
proved highly satisfactory and educational. A total of 1,038.40 tons 
of Sludge @ ;^4.375 per 2000-lb. ton was sold during this six-month 
period for a total of = ;4,543.00. 

Besides conducting Sales, the Sales Division has made considerable 
research into various legal aspects affected by different Sales, has 
made all preliminary surveys, prepared all information, collected and 
deposited all monoy received from Sales with the City Treasurer, and 
kept all records and correspondence attendant thereto. 

Inventory 

During the Fiscal Year 1952-1953 the equipment inventory program 
saw the completion of the physical inventory of City-owned equipment 
in departments as shown: 

California Palace of the Legion of Honor 

Controller 

Coroner 

Electricity 

Emergency Hospitals 

Health Central Offices and Health Centers 

Laguna Honda Home 

Law Library 

Sewage Disposal Plants 

A re -check was made of the following offices: 

Mayor 

Chief Administrative Officer 

City Attorney 

Tax Collector 

Public /idministrator 



-5- 

Inventory ( Continued ) 

A I'ocheck is now being made ot the Hassler Health Home. Upon 
completion of this work, a rocheck will be made at the San Francisco 
Hospital which is anticipated will require the balance of the coming 
Fiscal Year. 

Through our equipment inventory many transfers of equipment and 
supplies betv/een departments have been effected, enabling the rehab- 
ilitation of much discarded equipment for further use; in many cases 
this has obviated the necessity for additional purchases. The in- 
ventory division checks and analyzes requisitions for equipment with a 
view toward keeping such purchases in line with budgetary requests and 
preventing possible duplications. Standard procedure has been re- 
established in several departments. 

The permits for the operation of vending machines on city 
property in accordance with Ordinance No. 6562 have been kept current. 
In this connection close cooperation with the California State Depart- 
ment of Rehabilitation has been maintained. New Permittees and 
additional vending machines have been added. 

The Inventory Division has handled the moving and transfer of 
equipment and supplies between various locations for a total of 
$3,757.10. Of this amount approximately $2,000.00 represents the hand- 
ling and allocation of Disaster Corps materials, equipment, and suncrios 
supplied by the State Disaster Council from Sacramento. 

Investigations of and adjustments to the Inventory have been 
made on missing or stolen equipment in accordance with Section 127, 
Part 1 of the Municipal Code. 

The inventory, store-keeping, and accounting procedure at the 
Central Warehouse was re-organized last October. 



In connection with the proposed work program for the year 
1953-1954, it is expected that approximately 50 Sales will be con- 
ducted during the Fiscal Year consisting of the disposition of obsolete, 
unfit, or unnecessary equipment, and the keeping of the attendant re- 
cords. Revenue expected from such sales will reflect substantially 
the same amount of money as in the past year. 

The proposed work of the Inventory program includes a contin- 
uance of the type of work mentioned above and the maintenance of a 
perpetual inventory equipment on a current basis. The general equip- 
ment inventory is now approaching the two-thirds mark of completion 
and is already demonstrating its value in giving the City a complete, 
flexible, and comprehensive view of the fixed assets of the municipality, 
It further tends to improve the control of equipment in making the de- 
partment heads and officers more conscious of inventory value. 



-6- 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE CONTRIBUTIONS 

Tho Purchaser of Supplies is Chief of the Procurement Division 
of tho San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps. Key Personnel of the 
Purchasing Department have volunteered and havo been assigned to staff 
work in the Procurement Division. They have participated in all 
practice exercises and drills of the San Francisco Disaster Council and 
Corps and in cooperation with the other Divisions and Services havo 
developed procedures and establishec 1 sources of supply in order that 
the Procurement Division may function efficiently in tho event of an 
emergency. 

All purchasing for Civilian Defense is done through tho Purchas- 
ing Department. In addition, the receipt, storage and issuance of all 
materials, supplies and equipment for the Rescue and First Aid Service 
is under the direction of employees of the Purchasing Department. 

Substantial quantities of medical and rescue materials, supplies 
and equipment have been received from the State of California either as 
a loan or on a matching fund basis. In cooperation with the San Fran- 
cisco Disaster Council and Corps, proper custody and accountability 
have been established. Major items are as follows: 

2 Rescue Trucks, completely equipped 
16 Sets Rescue Equipment, complete 
91 Mobile First Aid Stations 

TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau of the Purchasing Depart- 
ment provides a wide variety of services available t o the several de- 
partments of the City and County of San Francisco on an interdepart- 
mental basis. 

Due to lack of adequate space for one central location, the 
services of the Bureau are housed in three separate locations in the 
City Hall in such manner as to minimize overlapping. The services per- 
formed and their respective locations are as follows: 

(1) The Blueprinting Section is located on the fifth floor 
and is equipped to process Blue Prints, Van Dykes, Cloth 
Prints, Duplicate Tracings, Dri-Prints, Vellums, etc. 

(2) The Tabulating Section is located in Room 158 and is 
equipped to process all types of Machine Accounting. 

(3) All other services, Photography, Photostating, Duplica- 
ting, and the Office of the Bureau, are located in 
Room 50 in the basement of City Hall. 



-7- 

TABULATING AND REPRODOCTION BUREAU ( Continu ed) 

The Bureau has 24 permanent operators and the volume of work 
performed during the Fiscal Year 1952-1953 amounted to $157,087.90. 
The regular staff of employees is augmented by the addition of temporary 
employments as required during the peak periods. 

In addition to the large volume of miscellaneous work performed 
by the Bureau, major continuing and recurring operations include the 
processing of Traffic Citations for the Municipal Court ; Annual Budget 
reproduction for all departments; blueprinting of Block Eook Maps for 
the assessor, Real Estate, Recorder, Tax Collector and Public Works; 
Register of Purchase Orders; Inventory of City and County Equipment. 

Effective July 1, 1953, a daily procedure will be inaugurated 
whereby all property sales and transfers recorded in the office of the 
City and County Recorder will be microfilmed in the Reproduction Bureau 
and prints will be prepared from the film for the Assessor in order 
that such changes may be reflected in his records. 

CENTRAL SHOPS 

The Purchasing Department through its Central Shops 1, 2, and 3, 
and sub-shops and garages is charged with the repair and maintenance of 
all city-owned automobiles, except Public Utilities, all other trucks 
and motor propelled vehicles, two fire boats, fire apparatus, Police 
and Health Department equipment, two high prossure pumping stations, 
bridges, street and sewer maintenance equipment, sewage treatment plants, 
Park locomotive and train, merry -g o-r ounds , f err is wheels, parking meter 
collection equipment, Log Cabin Ranch water supply pumps and motors, 
pasteurizing boiler and other miscellaneous mechanical and machine work 
at schools, etc. 

Shops and Garages are maintained as follows: 

Central Shop 1 313-363 Francisco Street 

Central Shop 2 2800 alameda Street 

Central Shop 3 1745 California Street 

Central Gas Station 15th & Harrison Streets 

Park Garage Golden Gate Park 

Hall of Justice Garage Washington & Kearny Streets 

19th avenue Sub-Station 2350 - 19th Avenue 

Health Garage Health Bldg. , 101 Grove St . 

Dept. of Electricity 264 Golden Gate avenue 

Motor Cycle Shop Southern Station, 

Fourth & Clara Streets 

North Point Sewage Treatment Plant. Bay •"c North Point Streets 

Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant... 1800 Jcrrold Avenue 

With the cooperation of the Fire Department, and in accordance 
with factory recommendations, an order was issued to slow down motor 
speeds on fire apparatus. This has decreased emergency breakdown work 



-8- 

CENTRAL SHOPS ( Continued ) 

in the shops and permitted the installation of a policy of periodic 
overhauls of fire equipment. 

The five (5) engine driven air raid warning sirens are still 
regularly tested and maintained, and in addition the shop has taken 
over the servicing of the communications division stand-by plant at 
the Youth Guidance Center. 

The new searchlight truck was put in service in the Fire Depart- 
ment shortly after the first of the year and has been operating satis- 
factorily. 

The Fleishhacker playground locomotive, tender and car trucks 
were recently overhauled. Now tires put on the locomotive drivers and 
front truck, the linkage and throttle overhauled and new oilers in- 
stalled. Complete new trucks of steel were built to replace those of 
wood and steel which were loose and worn out for both the tender and 
cars. The new trucks are equipped with new wheels and ball bearing 
journals and on account of the excess curvature of the track, one wheel 
on each axle was made free to turn independently of the other, this re- 
duces friction considerably. 

Maintenance and repairs at the three sewage plants are handled 
by Shops personnel. 

Storekeeping personnel are maintained by the Purchasing Depart- 
ment in each of the following locations to administer warehousing 
functions and distribution of City-owned material, equipment and 
supplies. Storerooms located at: 

Central Warehouse 15th & Harrison Streets 

Shop 1 2033 Stockton Street 

Water Department Shop Bryant Street Shop 

Municipal Railway Elkton Yard 

Municipal Railway 24th & Utah Streets 

Municipal Railway 949 Presidio Avenue 

Golden Gate Fark Golden Gate Park 

Fleishhacker Zoo Fleishhacker Zoo 

San Francisco Hospital 1001 Fotroro Avenue 

For the Fiscal Year 1952-1953, expenditures for materials and 
labor for the maintenance of equipment was ,^515,600.00, including 
supplemental appropriations of 312,077.00 for the Fire Department and 
$3,400.00 for the Police Department. It is noted that this amount is 
less than the previous fiscal year, even though material and labor 
costs have, in most instances, increased. 



-9- 

PERSONNEL 

The Purchasing Department is operated by 196 employees, divided 
into 39 classifications. The following is a tabulation of the number 
of employees by classification: 

1 Purchaser of Supplies 

1 Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

1 Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

8 Assistant Purchasers 

1 Printing and Stationery Buyer 

1 Assistant Stationery Buyer 

1 Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating Division 

1 General Superintendent of Shops 
3 Foreman, Auto Machinists 

2 Sub-Foreman, uuto Machinists 

2 Head Clerks 

3 Bookkeepers 

9 General Storekeepers 
20 Storekeepers 

4 General Clerks 

10 General Clerk-Stenographers 

17 General Clerk-Typists 

23 Garagemen 

3 Blacksmiths 

4 Blacksmith Finishers 
32 Auto Machinists 

1 Battcryman Electrician 

2 Patternmakers 

4 Car and Auto Painters 

2 Auto Fender and Body Workers 

1 Leather Worker 

1 Chauffeur 

2 Duplicating Machine Operators 
6 Key Punch Operators 

9 Tabulating Machine Operators 

1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 

4 Blueprinters 

1 Photostat Operator 

1 Photographer 

3 Laborers 

9 Machinists 



-10- 

PURCHASE ORDERS ISSUED 

JULY 1, 1952 TO JUNE 30, 1955 



MONTH 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



GENERAL 


EDUCATION 


No. of 


Value of 


No. of 


Value of 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


1,333 


$419,269.76 


672 


$269,865.54 


1,203 


430,782.43 


868 


406,647.31 


1,160 


451,300.61 


419 


105,279.03 


1,270 


377,525.70 


449 


170,652.93 


906 


305,823.89 


358 


165,706.34 


1,078 


383,776.91 


389 


104,315.39 


1,156 


421,441.00 


518 


227,990.80 


836 


357,837.50 


344 


183,044.24 


1,238 


499,531,76 


502 


139,315.78 


1,098 


340,505.06 


430 


232,170.93 


1,095 


378,082.36 


528 


157,697,41 


813 


210,417.20 


389 


118,320.84 



13,186 $4,576,294,23 



5,866 $2,281,006.54 



MONTH 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



HEALTH 



No. of 


Value of 


Orders 


Orders 


226 


$106,035.58 


419 


214,174.06 


360 


153,577.01 


379 


169,241.36 


227 


58,431.15 


• 463 


264,295.05 


389 


185,303.45 


313 


188,623.86 


324 


163,380.49 


445 


171,201.88 


321 


130,042.30 


154 


43,653.76 



UTILITIES 


No. of 


Value of 


Orders 


Orders 


595 


$291,870.77 


561 


399,508.44 


475 


299,918.68 


453 


243,334.43 


421 


288,250.01 


419 


232,468.64 


463 


488,879.35 


310 


288,754.55 


529 


443,177.09 


416 


286,915.59 


453 


383,853.46 


300 


134,212.44 



4,020 $1,847,959.95 



5,395 $3,781,143. 



45 



-11- 

PURCHASE ORDERS ISSUED 



MONTH 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



JULY 


1, 1952 TO JUNE 


30, 1953 




REVOLV 


ING FUND 
Value of 


TOTALS 


No. of 


No. of 


Value of 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


1,121 


$17,608.83 


3,947 


$1,104,650.48 


901 


14,958.83 


3,952 


1,466,071.12 


897 


14,459.91 


3,311 


1,024,535.24 


1,004 


15,852.91 


3,555 


976,607.33 


1,033 


18,400.13 


2,945 


836,611.52 


1,463 


34,092.24 


3,812 


1,018.948.23 


1,604 


37,316.68 


4,130 


1,360,931.28 


1,413 


34,225.43 


3,216 


1,052,485.58 


1,513 


33,812.36 


4,106 


1,279,217.43 


1,386 


31,593.13 


3,775 


1,062,391.64 


1,359 


30,534.24 


3,756 


1,080,209.77 


752 


16,661,18 


2,408 


523,265.42 


14,446 


$299,520.92 


42,913 


$12,785,925.09 



EXPENDITURES 

A COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURES FOR ALL APPROPRIATIONS (OTHER THAN THOSE 
FOR PERSONAL SERVICES) WITH ORIGINAL BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS FOR 
1952-1953: 



Account 



Budgeted Expended Surplus Deficit 



233.200.00 Contractual Serv. $33,793.00 $32,289.27 $1,503.73 $ 

233.300.00 Materials & Spls 12,305.00 13,685.75 -- 1,380.75 

233.400.01 Equipment (Purch.) 1,800.00 3,839.98 - -- 2,039,98 

233.400.02 Equipment (Shops) 3,550.00 3,517.09 32.91 
233.812.33 Personal Bonds 10,000.00 7,507.94 2,492.06 
233.813.33 Auto Insurance 8,250.00 21,870.19 ^ 13,620.19 

$69,698.00 $82,710.22 $4,028.70 $17,040.92 



-12- 



REVENUES 



A COMPARISON OF revenues with revenues estimated in eudget of 

1952-1953: 



account 


Estimated 
Income 


Actual 

Income 


Actual 

OVER 


Actual 

UNDER 


7062 Minor Sales 


|1,000.00 


>)3,950.91 


$2,950.91 


— 


7064 Misc. Sales 


-- 


24.98 


24.98 


-_ 



7099 Misc. Rev. 

Gen, Govt. 200.00 264.55 64.55 

7621 Swill and 

Grease and Bones 10,000.00 14,440.74 4,440.74 __ 

|11, 200. 00 $18,681.18 $7,481.18 



CONCLUSION 



The foregoing activities, along with inspections, testing, 
sampling, writing of specifications, setting up of annual, semi-annual, 
and quarterly buying schedules and other affiliated duties complete 
our report of the annual program for the coming fiscal year. 



Respectfully submitted, 




H. H. -"'Jones 
HHJ/sj Purchaser of /Supplies 




ANNUAL REPORT TO THE MAYOR 
FOR 
1953 - 195^ 



By the 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
of the 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 









City and County of San Francisco 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 

September 8, 195^ 

Honorable Elmer E. Robinson, Mayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
San Francisco, California 

Through: Mr. Thomas A. Brooks 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Dear Mayor Robinson: 

Pursuant to your request of August 18, 195*+, addressed to all 
departments relative to the departmental work programs, I respectfully 
submit the following annual report of work performed by the Purchasing 
Department during the fiscal year 1953-195^+s 

BUYING AND ACCOUNTING DIVISIONS 

Total Purchases made by the Purchasing Department for the 
various departments and the San Francisco Unified School District for: 

1953-195^ $13,972,937.63 

1952-1953 ...♦ 12,785,925.09 (After Ad- 
justment) 
an INCREASE of $ 1,187, 012. 5^ 

The Purchaser's Petty Purchase Revolving Fund, which has been 
extensively used this last fiscal year accounted for $333,889.02 
worth of small purchases for all the various departments. 

Payments and Discounts 

The drive continues to expedite payments to vendors and take 
advantage of all cash discounts. Particular attention is given to 
those payments involving large cash discounts. Results are very 
satisfactory and continue to improve. The cooperation of the Con- 
troller's Office and other City Departments has been very helpful in 
this connection. 

The fact that payments are now being processed more rapidly has 
been well received by vendors with whom the city does business. This 
has encouraged more local competition for city bids. 

DISCOUNTS 

For the period June 1, 1953 thru May 31, 195^. 

Dollars Percentage 

Cash Discounts TAKEN $ 28,901.^-1 9^.38$ 



-2- 

New Contract Procedure 

The new contract procedure has proven very satisfactory. A 
substantial saving of time has been noted in completing transactions. 

Departmental Revolving Funds ( Various Departments ) 

With the cooperation and approval of the Controller's Office, 
those departments having revolving funds are now permitted to make 
cash purchases up to $15.00. All such expenditures are subsequently 
checked in the Purchasing Department as to correct price, contract 
items, and the like and also audited by the Controller's Office. 
Departments, particularly those with large amounts of stores, are thus 
enabled to delete from their inventories many slow moving standard 
items of relatively low unit value. 

Annual Bid Bond 

Bidders now have the option of filing an annual bid bond rather 
than submitting a certified check with each bid requiring a deposit. 
This has proved very popular with bidders, particularly those firms 
who submit numerous bids during the year. 

Controller 

All changes and improvements in procedure have been done with 
the complete approval and cooperation of the Controller, especially 
in those cases where accounting policies are involved or where pro- 
cedure changes in the Purchasing Department affect the related pro- 
cedures in the Controller's Office, 

Total amount of Purchase Orders written 1953-195 1 ** 

GENERAL $ 5,203,350.78 

EDUCATION 2,335,938.12 

HEALTH 1.9*7, 531.61 

UTILITIES ^, 152, 228. 10 

REVOLVING FUND ^m T 889.02 

$ 13,972,937.63 

Purchaser's Petty Purchase Revolving Fund 

The maximum amount for Petty Purchase Orders at the present 
time is $50.00 with payments continuing to be made twice monthly and 
all discounts are taken on these orders. This system continues to 
operate very satisfactorily for the benefit of both the City depart- 
ments and the vendors. 



-3- 
Pur chaser 's Petty Purchase Revolving Fund ( Continued ) 

The following summary reflects the operation of the Purchaser's 
Revolving Fund for the year 19 53 -19 5^ s 

Number of individual orders written 1^,622 

Average number of monthly orders written ...... 1,218.5 

Total amount of money for fiscal year $ 333,889.02 

SALES AND INVENTORY DIVISION 

Sales 

Forty- two sales complete in themselves, plus one sale for Hay 
and other Agricultural Products which consisted of nine individual 
sales were conducted in 1953-195 1 *-, making an actual total of fifty-one 
sales for the year. Total revenue of all sales was $57,879.98. All 
sales were of personal property unfit or unnecessary for the use of 
the City and County of San Francisco, and all were made under the 
authority of Section 88 of the Charter. 

A breakdown of sales reflects the following: 

Dried Sewage Sludge * $ 13,^52,76 

Hay and Agricultural Products 13,259.11 

Swill 12,883.00 

School Equipment *+,92*+.50 

Metal and Other Scrap ^,051.73 

Cable Cars 1,69^.24- 

Poles * 1,085*20 

Waste Paper 283.15 

Grease and Bones 268.06 

Miscellaneous Sales . < 5,9 78.23 

TOTAL REVENUE FROM SALES $ 57,879,98 

Sales ( Continue d) 

The total revenue of sales shows a decrease from 1952-1953 of 
$67,381.65. This decrease is attributed to the present economic and 
political world status. The trend in sales for 1953-195^ was toward 
disposal of agricultural products, waste matter, obsolete equipment, 
etc. with a view to clearance of warehouses and yards. 

Besides conducting sales, the sales division has made consider- 
able research into various legal aspects affected by different sales, 
has made all preliminary surveys and inspections, prepared all infor- 
mation and specifications, collected and deposited all money received 
from sales with the City Treasurer, made quarterly reports to the 
California State Board of Equalization on sales tax, and kept all 
records and correspondence attendant to the sales. 



Inventory 

The equipment inventory program during the fiscal year 1953- 
195H-, with the exception of the Superior Court and the Public Defend- 
er's Office, was concerned exclusively with the Health Department. 
The inventory crew completed the physical inventory of City-owned 
equipment at Hassler Health Home in July of 1953? and, with the two 
exceptions mentioned, spent the balance of the year at San Francisco 
Hospital. A re-check was made of the Board of Supervisor's Office. 

Through the equipment inventory many transfers of equipment and 
supplies between departments were effected, enabling the rehabilitation 
of much discarded equipment for further use; in many cases this has 
obviated the necessity for additional purchases. The inventory division 
checks and analyses requisitions for equipment with a view toward keep- 
ing such purchases in line with budgetary requests and preventing pos- 
sible duplications. Standard procedure has been re-established in 
several recalcitrant departments. 



Permits for the operation of vending machines on City property 
in accordance with Ordinance No. 6562 were kept current, necessitating 
close co-operation with the California State Department of Rehabilita- 
tion. Additional vending machines and new locations were added as re- 
quested and approved. 

The inventory division handled the moving and transfer of equip- 
ment and supplies between various locations for a total of $11,876.10 
for the year. Of this amount approximately $700.00 represented the 
handling and allocation of Disaster Corps materials, equipment, and 
sundries supplied by the State Disaster Council from Sacramento. 
The moving of the School Department Offices into new quarters in Com- 
merce High School Building accounted for $7,900.00. 

Research work including the gathering of evidence and pertinent 
data for the preparation of the City's appeal from the decision of the 
State Public Utilities Commission relative to the moving and transfer 
tariff was performed. 

Investigations, follow-ups, and adjustments were made to the 
perpetual inventory on missing or stolen equipment in accordance with 
Section 127, Part 1 of the Municipal Code. 

Various special assignments and services as assigned by the 
Purchaser of Supplies were carried out by this division of the Pur- 
chasing Department during the fiscal year 1953-195^, among which were 
the following: 



-5- 

1. Office and accounting procedure at Central Warehouse and 
Shop No. 2 was co-ordinated and reorganized. 

2. Storeroom procedure was set up at San Francisco Hospital. 

3. Investigations of lost and stolen equipment were conducted, 
and the return of many stolen items was effected. 

In connection with the proposed work program for the year 
195^-1955, it is expected that approximately fifty sales will be con- 
ducted, consisting of the disposition of obsolete, unfit, or unneces- 
sary equipment and the keeping of the attendant records. Revenue ex- 
pected from such sales will reflect about fifty percent more money 
than in the past year. 

The proposed work of the inventory program for the immediate 
future provides for the physical check of the Fire Department and for 
a continuance of the type of work mentioned above, with the maintenance 
of a perpetual equipment inventory on a current basis. The general 
equipment inventory is now approaching the final stages on completion 
and is already demonstrating its value in giving the City a complete, 
flexible, and comprehensive viev; of the fixed assets of the munici- 
pality. It further tends to improve the control of equipment in mak- 
ing the department heads and officers more conscious of inventory 
value. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE CONTRIBUTIONS 

The Purchaser of Supplies is Chief of the Procurement Division 
of the San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps. Key personnel of the 
Purchasing Department have volunteered and have been assigned to staff 
work in the Procurement Division. They have participated in all prac- 
tice exercises and drills of the San Francisco Disaster Council and 
Corps and in cooperation with the other Divisions and Services have 
developed procedures anc" established sources of supply in order that 
the Procurement Division may function efficiently in the event of an 
emergency. 

All purchasing for Civilian Defense is done through the Pur- 
chasing Department. In addition, the receipt, storage and issuance 
of all materials, supplies and equipment for the Rescue and First Aid 
Service is under the direction of employees of the Purchasing Depart- 
ment. 

Substantial quantities of medical and rescue materials, sup- 
plies and equipment have been received from the State of California 
either as a loan or on a matching fund basis. In cooperation with 
the San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps, proper custody and ac- 
countability have been established. 

TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Eureau has twenty-four permanent 



-6- 

TABULATING AND RE PRODUCTION BUREAU ( Continued ) 

employees and the gross amount of work performed during the fiscal 
year 1953-195^ amounted to $159,309.39. 

Service is provided through the use of interdepartmental work 
orders for more than fifty city and county departments who make regu- 
lar use of the facilities of the Bureau. 

The greater percentage of the volume of work performed by the 
Bureau is of a continuing and recurring nature, such as: the proces- 
sing of Traffic Citations, Budget reproduction, printing of Block 
Maps, Register of Purchase Orders, Inventory of the City and County 
equipment, and the preparation of Transcripts of Property Sales and 
Transfers for the Assessor*, 

With reference to the preparation of Transcripts, this proce- 
dure was made effective on July 1, 1953 and has proven most satisfac- 
tory to the Assessor, and is therefore being continued on a permanent 
basis. 

Expansion of the work program during the fiscal year 195^-1955 
is the result of a decision made by the Tax Collector to replace the 
present manual system of maintaining License Fee records with IBM 
machine accounting. The machine processing of these records for the 
Tax Collector will be done by the Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau 
of the Purchasing Department, 

The inaugural step in this program will be the cut-over to the 
License Fee records for Apartment Houses numbering approximately five 
thousand. The greater part of the preliminary work required has al- 
ready been completed. Actual processing of the records will coincide 
with the billing date for Apartment House License Fees in September, 
195^o 

CENTRAL SHOPS 

The Par chasing Department through its Central Shops No's. 1, 
2, and 3> sub-shops and garages, is charged with the repair and main- 
tenance of all city-owned automobiles, except Public Utilities, and 
all other trucks and motor propelled vehicles, mechanical apparatus 
and machines, Fire apparatus, Police and Health department equipment, 
two high pressure pumping stations, bridges, street and sewer main- 
tenance equipment, sewage treatment plants, park locomotive and train, 
merry-go-rounds, ferris wheels, parking meter collection equipment, 
Log Cabin Ranch water supply pumps and motors, pasteurizing boiler and 
other miscellaneous mechanical and machine work at schools, etc. 



-7- 

CENTRAL SHOPS ( Continued ) 

Shops and garages are maintained at the following locations: 

Central Shop No. 1 >••••••••••••■•••••• 313 Francisco Street 

Central Shop No. 2 2800 Alameda Street 

Central Shop No. 3 , 17*+5 California Street 

Central Gas Station 15th & Harrison Streets 

Gas Station & Grease Rack 2323 Army Street 

Park Garage • Golden Gate Park 

Hall of Justice Garage Washington & Kearny 

Street 

19th Ave., Sub-Station 2350 - 19th Avenue 

Health Garage Health Bldg-101 Grove 

Street 

Dept. of Electricity , , 26^ Golden Gate Avenue 

Motorcycle Shop ....................... Southern Sta. If th & 

Clara Streets 

No. Point Sewage Treatment Plant ♦ Bay & No. Point Streets 

Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant ...... 1800 Jerrold Avenue 

Richmond -Sunset Sewage Treatment Plant. Golden Gate Park 

Final repairs to the roof and skylights at Shop No. 1 were com- 
pleted in June, 195^. Log Cabin Ranch water supply motor and pumps 
and the milk pasteurization boiler are serviced quarterly. The Shops 
also regularly service the five-engine driven air raid warning sirens, 
the communications stand-by plant at Youth Guidance Center and the Fire 
Department radio stand-by plant on Twin Peaks. The two City owned 
fire boats formerly maintained by the Shops were retired from service 
in June, but all the fire-fighting equipment and fittings on the new 
State owned fire boat Phoenix is serviced and maintained by City shops. 

Relative to Fire Department equipment, replacement parts for 
about 20$ of semi-modern equipment are no longer manufactured. These 
are required to be made by jobbers at extra expense. Replacement 
parts are still available for about 20$ of the oldest 2-wheel brake 
equipment which equipment should be replaced as soon as possible. 

Storekeeping personnel are maintained by the Purchasing De- 
partment in each of the following locations to administer warehousing 
functions and distribution of City-owned material, equipment and 
supplies. Storerooms are located at: 

Central Warehouse 15th & Harrison Streets 

Shop No. 1 2033 Stockton Street 

Water Department Yard ......... Bryant Street 

Municipal Railway ( Elkton Yard 

(2^th & Utah Streets 

(Kirkland, No. Point & Powell 

(Ocean & San Jose Avenues 

(9*+9 Presidio Avenue 

(17th & Potrero 

(17th & Potrero, Transfer Room 



-8- 

CENTRAL SHOPS ( Conti nued) 

Recreation & Park Department ... Park Garage, Golden Gate Park 

San Francisco Hospital , 1001 Potrero Avenue 

Laguna Honda Home ••••••«••••••• 7th Ave*. & Dewey Blvd. 

Hassler Health Home ............ Redwood City 

Hetch Hetchy Hetch Hetchy, Moccasin, Calif, 

Works • 2323 Army Street 

Electricity .»••»...... 2&+ Golden Gate Ave. 

For the fiscal year 1953-195^, expenditures for materials and 
labor for the maintenance of equipment amounted to $526,398.00 in- 
cluding supplemental appropriations for the Fire and Police Depart- 
ments of $14-, 650. 00 and $8,550.00, respectively. 

PERSONNEL 

The Purchasing Department is operated by 198 employees, divided 
into 39 classifications. The following is a tabulation of the number 
of employees by classifications: 

1 Purchaser of Supplies 

1 Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

1 Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

7 Assistant Purchasers 

1 Printing and Stationery Buyer 

1 Assistant Stationery Buyer 

1 Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating Division 

1 General Superintendent of Shops 
3 Foreman, Auto Machinists 

2 Sub-Foreman, Auto Machinists 

2 Head Clerks 

3 Bookkeepers 

9 General Storekeepers 

21 Storekeepers 

*+ General Clerks 

10 General Clerk-Stenographers 

17 General Clerk-Typists 

25 Garageman 

3 Blacksmiths 

k Blacksmith Finishers 

32 Auto Machinists 

1 Batteryman Electrician 

2 Patternmakers 

h Car and Auto Painters 

2 Auto Fender and Body Workers 

1 Leather Worker 

1 Chauffeur 



-9- 



FER SONNE! ( Continu ed) 



2 Duplicating Machine Operators 

6 Key Punch Operators 

9 Tabulating Machine Operators 

1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 

k Blueprinters 

1 Photostat Operator 

1 Photographer 

2 Laborers 

9 Machinists 

1 General Foreman kut~. Machinist 



PURCHASE ORDERS PAID 
JULY 1, 19 «n TO JUNE ^0. 19flf 



MONTH 



GENERAL 



EDUCATION 



No. of 
Orders 



July 


1,922 


August 


It 25? 


September 


1,084 


October 


1,239 


November 


1,030 


December 


1,218 


January 


iJlW 


February 


959 


March 


1,*33 


April 


1,139 


May 


1,193 


June 


839 



Value of 
Orders 

$6 73, 193. 8U 
501,518.25 
¥f 5,9^2.60 

M-69,056.17 
330,83^.63 
392,908.95 
353,872.12 
^03,103.^8 
558,563.0*+ 
3^7,08^.08 
^5,693.12 
276,580.50 



No. of Value of 

Orders Order s 

691 $230 j 131. 87 

*+95 233,611.7* 

267 1¥+, 25hM 

560 168,283.^5 

335 93,3^9.62 

605 299,331.^5 

M+6 107,04-9.^1 

382 257,028.27 

589 370,832.60 

>+8l 138,211.71 

kch 182,97^.20 

h$6 110,279.39 



1^,^63 $5,203,350.78 



5,711 $2,335,938.12 



-10- 
PURCHAS E ORDERS PAI D 
JULY 1 T 1953 TO JUNE ^0. 19ftf 



MONTH 



HEALTH 



UTILITIES 





No. of 


Value of 


No. of 


Value of 




Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


July 


570 


$270,286.37 
1^,261.96 


737 


$590,168.39 


August 


3*+3 


^77 


36^51.98 


September 


263 


lU-3, 908. 19 


^31 


33^,692.25 


October 


1+15 


202,9Mf.if3 


M-63 


293,238.7^ 


November 


371 


160,6^-7.^1 


hhQ 


296,127.30 


December 


^ 15 


172, 0^+6. 98 


k8B 


356,999.72 


January 


tfl»+ 


177,1^0.33 


hk7 


5^5,819.08 


February 


228 


68,5^6.85 


M)2 


282,592.16 


March 


527 


255,335.36 


512 


307,060.69 


April 


355 


172,369.51 


if 56 


283,79^.80 


May 


280 


93,137.20 


ifi+9 


300,317.^7 


June 


150 


86,907.02 


208 


196,952.52 




^,331 


$1,9^7,531.61 


5,518 


$*f, 152, 223. 10 



MONTH 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



REVOLVING FUND 



GRAND TOTALS 



No. of 
Orders 

1,156 
1,253 
1,153 
1,178 
1,1V7 
1,210 
1,265 
1,156 

1 M5 
1,306 

1,217 
1,166 



Value of 
Orders 

$ 25,729.78 
27,280.0^ 
26,^1.51 
25,991.57 
25,026.29 
26,101.33 
28,371.72 
27,669.^ 
33,136.26 
30,513.03 
29,058.52 
28,069.53 



No. of 
Orders 

5,076 
3,827 
3,198 
3,855 
3,331 
3,936 
3,720 

?>, 12 ? 

3,737 
3,5*6 
2,819 



Value of 
Orders 



1,789, 
1,271, 
1,095, 
1,159, 

905, 
l,2>f7, 
1,213, 
1,0>3, 
1,52^-, 

971, 
1,051, 

698, 



510.25 
123.97 
238.96 
51>f.36 
985.25 
388.^-3 
352.66 
9^0.20 
927.95 
973.13 
180.51 
801.96 



l*f,622 $333,889.02 



hk,6k$ $13,972,937.63 



******** 



-11- 

EXPENDITURES 

A COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURES FOR ALL APPROPRIATIONS (OTHER THAN THOSE 
FOR PERSONAL SERVICES) WITH ORIGINAL BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS FOR 
1953-195>m 

Account Budgeted Expended Surplus Deficit 

333.200.00 Contractual Serv. $36,871.00 $1*1,291.00 — $lf,lf20.00 

333.300.00 Materials & Spls. 11,52^.00 13,196.00 — 1,672.00 

333. ^00. 01 Equipment (Purch.) 1,390.00 1,377.00 13.00 

333. 1 +00.02 Equipment (Shops) 3,871.00 6,168.00 — 2,297.00 

333.812,33 Personal Bonds 10,000.00 7,305.00 2,695.00 

333.813.33 Auto Insurance 22,500.00 18,96^.00 3,536.00 ^ 

$86,156.00 $88,301.00 $6,2M*.00 $8,389.00 

REVENUES 

A COMPARISON OF REVENUES WITH REVENUES ESTIMATED IN BUDGET OF 
19 53 -19 5^5 



Account 


Estimated 
Income 


Actual 
Income 


Actual 
OVER 


Actual 

UNDER 


7061 Sale of 
Documents 


$ 50.00 


$ 238.00 


$ 188.00 $ 


7062 Minor Sales 


100.00 


3,550.00 


3A50.00 


— 


706^ Misc. Sales 


— 


21.00 


21.00 


— 


709*+ Misc. Revenue 


225.00 


— 


— 


225.00 


7621 Sale of Swill 


11,300.00 


12,5^.00 


l,2M+.00 


-. 


7621 Sale of Grease 
& Bones 


3,000.00 


782.00 


— 


2,218.00 


MfOl Checks Forfeited 


— 


100.00 


100.00 


— 



$1^,675.00 $17,235.00 $5,003.00 $2,Mf3.00 

********** ****** 



-12- 



CONCLUSIOM 



The foregoing activities, along with inspections, testing,, 
sampling, writing of specitications, setting up of annual, semi-annual, 
and quarterly buying schedules and other affiliated duties complete 
oar report of the annual program for the coming fiscal year. 



Respectfully submitted > 



KHJ/sJ 



/ H. 1i. Jorie^/ 

Furchaser-^of Supplies